Read It First at Patreon

Do you want to be the first to read new and unpublished writing? Guess what, kids — that’s a thing now. Because if you didn’t know it, I’m sharing the new goods at Patreon now.

Patreon is a subscription-based service which connects creators and their supporters. Artists, musicians, podcasters — anyone who makes things for other people to enjoy — are all using Patreon to support their work.

Patreon means even more reading for you. Photo: James Tarbotton/unsplash

Patreon means even more reading for you. Photo: James Tarbotton/unsplash

It’s especially useful for a novelist like myself. Because I usually put out one novel a year (maybe two, in a very good year), income isn’t exactly on a biweekly schedule like a full-time paycheck would be. Like most writers, I’ve always supplemented with freelance work. In my case, that has meant a lot of social media work, ghost writing, blogging and other creative work.

Freelancing is great, don’t get me wrong, and I’ve been fortunate to grow into a successful social media marketer and content writer in a very competitive field. But it takes away the one thing I need in order to put out my next novel for you to read: time to write.

That was the first thing that made me eye Patreon. But still, I wasn’t sure it would work for me. I kept putting the idea on the back-burner.

BUT, while I was busy realizing that freelancing was killing the novels it was supposed to be supporting, I also noticed that social media, specifically Facebook, is becoming more and more unpleasant. Everyone’s always picking a fight. I’m not sure what the reason is — maybe people can’t help themselves. But expressing an opinion as simple as liking a video of a cute kid on a horse, or as complicated as disappointment in a top-level eventer’s bitting choices, can set a person up for a lot of ugly argument and name-calling. I was frustrated by this, because I want to have conversations about the business of horses with my readers — after all, that’s what my books are all about.

(Actual footage of a Facebook fight)

Back in January, I made the decision to start a Patreon program that tackles both of these problems. One, with subscribers who support my fiction writing, I can stop thinking about ghost writing another blog post about equine nutrition and get back to working on my next novel — letting subscribers read the work they’re subsidizing along the way.

Two, when there’s a discussion worth having about the business of horses, we can have it in a safe space, free of Facebook’s inevitable bad mojo and fighting.

July marks the six-month b-day of my Patreon program, and I am excited to say… this experiment is working! When I decided to launch a subscription service at Patreon, I was working against all of my instincts, and I knew it. Share my new novels chapter-by-chapter as I write them? Are you kidding? I don’t publish before at least two massive revisions and usually one rewrite.

(Actual footage of a first draft being written)

But it’s such a pleasure to share stories as they’re written (and working just a bit harder on getting the first draft right will surely save me time on the second one, right?).

Plus, I love having a conversation about the story’s direction, how readers are connecting with the settings and situations, and what we should do next. I’m also going back through my old notebooks, sharing unpublished sketches, stories and scenes — even visiting the early, abandoned versions of The Head and Not The Heart and Ambition. 

All of this is a long blog post to say, I’d love to have you take a look at my Patreon and see if I’m offering something you’re looking for. Starting at a dollar a month, you can read unpublished work I share at least once a month. There are more tiers as well, which include rewards like reading a new chapter of my novels in progress once a month (with an ebook of the finished product coming your way at publication, so you don’t have to buy it!) and critiques of your own writing projects so we can get you to publication yourself.

If you’re looking for more horse stories to read, and great horse people to talk to, come join us!

Just visit patreon.com/nataliekreinert — see you there!

Making Writing a Habit: So You Want to Write a Horse Book, Part 4

So now you’re blogging, right? You’ve read the first three parts of my series, and you’re following all of my advice, not in a crazy follow-the-guru kind of way, but in a she’s-been-down-this-road kind of way. You’re thinking about the way you want to write, if you’re going to write as true-to-life as you can, or if you’re going to create a new universe for your characters to inhabit. You’re ready to start making this thing happen.

(This is the 4th in my series on writing your horse book. Click for the first, second, and third in the series.)

Whether or not you plot your book is another blog post. For now, I want to talk about writing habits.

Horses like routines. It turns out, horse books do too.

Horses like routines. It turns out, horse books do too.

There are always people to tell you that award-winning best-selling author Junie Efficiency Jones gets up every morning at 5:30 AM to write a chapter before she goes off to feed her heirloom chickens and then heads to her Fortune 500 executive position. That’s great for her and I’m excited for her productivity level. But I’ve always fought against those arguing that habit is the only way to write a book.

For one thing, I would argue, my schedule is too up-and-down to have a daily time set aside. I might have to work at 8 AM one day and 2:30 PM the next day — was I really supposed to write at 6 AM regardless? Not possible. Since a lot of writers are supporting themselves in the service industry, this is a common problem.

By the same token, if you’re in the horse business, you might have an early show one day, a farrier appointment that takes three hours longer than you expected and pushes dinner back to nine o’clock the next night, and quite frankly not have the energy to even look at your computer on the third day.

So no problem, I’ve always said. Write when you can. Carve out time. Write when you feel creative.

This method works, and it’s the kindest on your body, for sure. But I want you all to stop and consider for a moment how long it takes me to write a book. (Those of you who read my books are nodding slowly.) And how long I have to fend off requests for sequels. (Those of you who asked for a sequel to Ambition for two years are nodding emphatically.)

Now I’m going to tell you that I’m finally a convert to the writing routine.

My last (fairly) routine job was with the NYC Dept. of Parks and Recreation. Here I am on Monte in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. (My son came to visit.)

My last (fairly) routine job was with the NYC Dept. of Parks and Recreation. Here I am on Monte in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. (My son came to visit.)

In mid-June I started working a Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:30 kind of job. It’s the first time I’ve had a job like this in several years (the last time was when I taking care of horses and riding with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, during which period I wrote Other People’s Horses and Ambition), and I was faced with the very real possibility that I was not going to come home from work and feel like staring at yet another computer for an hour in the evening.

(I also wanted to work out. Call me crazy, but when you take a lifetime of riding and caring for horses professionally and cram it into an office chair, bad things happen. The work-out was pretty imperative to my well-being.)

I decided to write a thousand words every morning, before work. The only thing I was really giving up was my morning Twitter time. And since I work in social media, I was already spending plenty of time on Twitter. I really didn’t need the extra.

It was a struggle at first, I admit. But I stuck with it because it was the only time I was going to write. There was no way I was going to get home from work at six o’clock, work out for half an hour, take a shower, and still find the time (and energy) to work.

Here’s the thing: after a couple of weeks, writing that thousand words became hard-wired into my brain. I woke up thinking about my story. I started writing fifteen hundred words. I started writing two thousand words. Useful, good words — not filler. In fact, I was moving so fast on the plot, I realized I’d have to add in atmosphere and environments in the editing phase — the opposite of my usual writing style.

In short, I’d never written so much, so quickly, wish such ease.

It’s so frustrating!

I held off on the “get up in the morning and write” doctrine for so long, convinced it wasn’t for me, and all this time, I could have been pouring on the creativity.

An added boost: stopping to go to work no matter where I am in my thoughts. Have you ever heard of closing your story mid-sentence, to boost your creativity when you return to the document? It’s the same thing. It works. There’s less wandering around, and more action.

I’m also more aware of where I am in the story, which leads to fewer loose threads to tie up in edits. If you’ve ever read through a draft only to discover you introduced a plot point in chapter three but completely forgot about it by chapter six, you know what I’m talking about. It’s a problem. 

By the time I finished the first draft of Courage last month, I was writing two thousand words in about forty-five minutes each morning. Standing at my kitchen counter, drinking my coffee, I’d written a novel at least twice as fast as I’d ever written anything of comparable length… 85,000 words, with plenty of room to grow in edits.

Now I’m editing in small bites each morning (still standing at my kitchen counter–it turns out that I think much better on my feet than in a chair, which should come as no surprise to any horseman) and I’m about halfway through. The book is growing in beautiful ways. I still wake up and open my laptop without even thinking about it… writing as soon as I get up is completely habit now.

So this is it… possibly my number one piece of advice to you. Get a habit. Force yourself into the habit. And the habit will reward you richly.

Just for giggles, I looked up “famous writer’s habits.” This was the first hit: The Daily Routines of 12 Famous Writers. Here are a few quotes:

E.B. White: A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper.

Haruki Marakami: The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a form of mesmerism. I mesmerize myself to reach a deeper state of mind.

Barbara Kingsolver: My morning begins with trying not to get up before the sun rises. But when I do, it’s because my head is too full of words, and I just need to get to my desk and start dumping them into a file.

I really love that last one, because this is the state you can work yourself into through a habit of morning writing! This is the place I’m at when I’m writing a draft now, and it’s just so delightful.

Even with the lack of sleep.

What’s your writing routine? Have you tried and failed one, or do you have a routine that’s working for you? If not, what’s getting in your way? Maybe we can find a solution together.

Authentic Settings: So You Want To Write A Horse Book, Part 2

For me, writing horse books is rooted in authenticity.

(This is the 2nd post in the series, So You Want To Write A Horse Book. Read the first post here.)

This can get tiresome for a writer, when you’re trying to follow a plot thread and find that it leads to a dead end, or a “that wouldn’t happen in real life” situation, but it’s the price we pay for writing for the pickiest group of readers in the universe.

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A casual viewer sees a beautiful horse in a field of wildflowers. An equestrian wonders what kind of flowers they are, if they’re poisonous, zooms in to see if that’s a manure pile in the background, and starts wondering when that horse last had a fecal exam for parasites. Horse people. Think. Differently.

(You think I’m exaggerating, but I’m not. Here is an excerpt from an actual review left an Amazon:

“I tried, I really did but I couldn’t get past chapter 3. Chapter one was bad enough where the supposed “expert” horse trainer expresses his concern that the horse has injured its ANKLE (seriously????).”

Now, this was my first book, and I’d slaved over the details, and I was selling it on the virtue of its details, so this review felt like more than just the usual slap in the face sensation I get from your regularly scheduled bad reviews. So I broke a major rule of writing and responded to the bad review with an editorial example of using the word “ankle” in horse-racing circles:

‘The “ankle” issue is a verbiage commonly used in horse racing. For example: “Havre de Grace Retired With Ankle Injury” (The Blood-Horse, April 25, 2012: http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/69168/havre-de-grace-retired-with-ankle-injury). The term “ankle” is generally used when speaking of the fetlocks and lower-leg issues. Again, that’s a horse racing quirk; it might not be true of everyone’s equine experience, however.’

I’ll never know if the reviewer forgave me for using a word she wasn’t familiar with, but I would assume not. And there you have it, an example of writing for equestrians.)

I guess a very real question a potential writer might have right now is, “Why would you do this to yourself?”

We just do.

Authentic settings: this is a decision you have to make before you begin typing your first paragraphs of your book. It’s not just about using the right brush on your horse; it’s also, it’s a a lot, about settings. You have to decide: will your book reflect the real world like a window, or like a mirror?

It’s easier to make your own rules when you’re dealing with show horses, to set up a kind of looking-glass version of reality, with your own divisions and point systems, and avoid wading into the sea of mysteries that is double-A rated shows and Marshall & Sterling points and getting qualifications for entering an Advanced level Three-Day Event, unless you are incredibly comfortable in that environment.

By incredibly comfortable, I mean, you’ve been riding, training, and showing in those divisions for years. You can fill out an entry form with your eyes closed. It’s part of your normal daily life.

The need for this precision is real. Most people might not notice if you get a couple of show-ring details wrong, although if you call a fetlock an ankle, watch out! (…kidding…) But there are people who will, and they will call you out on it. There will be A-circuit kids reading your A-circuit novel, and you’re going to say something that annoys them.

It’s just a question of keeping those annoyances to a minimum.

Everyone comes up with a different solution to the window/looking glass problem. Here are three examples:

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Choosing real vs. fictional locations is all about your comfort level. Photo: Natalie Keller Reinert

Reality for the Setting; Fiction for the Close-Ups:

I use real governing bodies (The Jockey Club, The United States Eventing Association) and real championships/stake races (The American Eventing Championships, the Kentucky Derby) along with fictional competition. My horses run in races of my own invention (The Mizner Stakes) and in made-up events (The Sunshine State Horse Trials). For locations, I only write about racetracks I’m very familiar with, like Saratoga (the setting for Other People’s Horses), or Aqueduct, Tampa Bay Downs, Gulfstream Park, and a few others. I write almost exclusively about Florida and New York because I know those places so well. I wouldn’t be able to write a compelling, authentic story about a barn in Arizona, or California, or even Illinois, because I just don’t know those places at all.

I do make sure my timing is right as well. If I’m running a horse in a fictional stakes at Gulfstream, it’s when Gulfstream would actually be open for racing. But I make up the races to avoid A) stealing glory from horses who have actually won those races; and B) to avoid getting caught up in the pesky details of condition books, qualifications, weights, etc., which is just way too much effort to put into a novel, however correct I’d like it to be. I would consider this the middle-road for authentic settings.

Keep it Real:

Fellow racing writer Mara Dabrishus isn’t afraid to get completely into real-life competition in the Breeders’ Cup and other major stakes races, and she does a great job of depicting American racing without feeling the need to spend a lot of time explaining what the hell she’s talking about. She spends more time on the actual backstretch of actual racetracks than I do. When I have Alex retreat to a rented barn or back to the farm, Mara’s characters are still slugging it out on-site at Belmont or Gulfstream. I have a lot of admiration for her discipline in this regard. I also find that when I’m reading her books, my eye is drawn to the details of places I recognize and know intimately. I’m always testing her descriptions against my memories. Be aware that when you use a real locale, you will have readers who know that place inside-out, possibly better than you do. This style is a gutsy move.

Create a Fictional, but Believable, Setting to Support the Story:

My friend Jessica Burkhart went with entirely fictional lower and collegiate-level organizations for her series Canterwood Crestwhich features secondary-school competition. Rather than get wrapped up in different sports, governing bodies, and the intricacies of Young Riders Championships and the Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association, she simply developed a series of district, regional, and national championships which her characters could compete in, with the end-goal being the real United States Equestrian Team. The wisdom of this approach: it gives you so much more time to concentrate on story, and it allows riders (and hey, non-riders) of all disciplines to enjoy the series without needing technical explanations of how the discipline is run. Your story has plenty of room to shine.

What’s Right For You?

I think I can speak for anyone reading this when I say we’re all on a quest for authenticity. That’s what our readers tell us they love, over and over again. Even this one-star review for my first novel contained this caveat: “Writer was good with the horse terms and nailed the references to the life of a rider.” (The first part of the review, of course, was that it was a terrible story.)

So I believe it goes without saying that we’re all going to write the truest thing we know when it comes to our horses and our riding. We will never be allowed to gallop out of the arena after a jumping class without severe consequences; we will never feed our horse a celebratory pizza on his birthday; we will never put our neighbor’s kid on our Grand Prix dressage horse that we adopted from the BLM when we were 12 years old and had in the Olympics by the time we were 15; we will never wear a red coat to a short stirrup class, or a shadbelly to show-jumping class. I don’t have to actually point that out because we all know better. I just do it to point out what we’ve been reading all our lives, and why we’re so excited to change all that.

One good way to decide on your commitment level is to write (or think aloud in the shower, whatever works for you) the general plot-line of your book. And we’ll talk more about that in the future, but in the meantime, think of it like this. You say to yourself, “And then Michelle finds out she has a shot at the Young Riders Championships.”

You pause and think about the Young Riders Championships.

-How much do you know about it?

-How much research will you have to put into accurately portraying the Young Riders Championships?

-Will this present obstacles to your timelime? Maybe you’re writing a story with a big Christmas climax or a new foal is born at some point, but the Young Riders Championships is in July and that would throw everything off. Do you really want to change the entire story because now it needs to end in July instead of January?

-If any of these things feel problematic, consider how easy it be to simply make Young Riders into something else plausible. Why not just make up a championship called the Eventing Youth Nationals? Boom, done, easy. Your problems are solved.

Deciding on the level of authenticity in your story’s setting has much to do with your comfort level with the topics you’re tackling. If you feel at all in over your head, back away and do some serious soul-searching about how important that setting really is to your story. It might be everything. Or it might make more sense to just wave your fiction wand and make a new, more suitable setting come to life.

If you choose this route, you are not giving up your equestrian street cred. You’re actually cementing it by committing to the details you know — the nitty-gritty of equestrian life, the ins and outs of the days we spend with horses — and not compromising the knowledge level you’re presenting to your also-knowledgeable readers by winging it with some of the things they know by heart.

What are your thoughts on this subject?

 

So You Want to Write a Horse Book, Part 1

You can write a horse book! This blog series will help aspiring writers put their equestrian novel together, from bestselling author Natalie Keller Reinert.

Updated March 17, 2019 by Natalie Keller Reinert

I’ve been writing horse books for the past eight years. It started out as a wish: I wish there were more horse books I wanted to read! It turned into a project: I’m going to write a book I’d like to read. It ended up as a career: in 2019, I decided to write horse books (and some other fiction) full-time.

So You Want to Write a Horse Book is a blog series I started in 2016 to help answer the questions I regularly get from aspiring equestrian fiction writers. Whether you want to write young adult, middle grade, chapter books, or adult fiction for equestrians, there’s a big beautiful publishing world waiting for you!

Let's talk about how to write horse books.

Let’s talk about how to write horse books.

You’ll find posts in this series on everything from how to ask for criticism (and not die of embarrassment/horror when you get it) to how to choose your book’s cover image. And anytime you have more questions about how to write a horse book, just ask! Leave a comment or send an email, and I’ll try to answer it for you.

Are you ready? Let’s start!

What is a Horse Book?

A horse book, in my definition, is a book about equestrian life. It can be a romance, a literary fiction, a mystery novel, or even a steampunk combination of all three of those things. What qualifies the book as a horse book is that it has scenarios and characters recognizable to the equestrian community.

I classify what I write as Equestrian Fiction. That means my books are written specifically for equestrians to understand and enjoy. I don’t spend a lot of time explaining equine terms, trusting that non-equestrian readers can judge what I’m talking about based on context, use Google to learn more, or simply move on and enjoy the story. I also write with an adult audience in mind, although I recognize that in the equestrian world, teens are often living very adult lives, so I consider them my audience, as well.

This genre didn’t always exist, and if you ask a big book retailer, it still doesn’t exist. That’s why Equestrian Fiction dominates non-fiction categories like Horse Care, and Equestrian Sports on Amazon. It’s just one of those things you’ll have to deal with if you write equestrian fiction: this genre boasts the most popular books for equestrians, but no real category.

That’s a gripe for another time.

Equestrian Fiction is growing by the month. Established writers are continuing their series, and new writers are showing up with fantastic reads. If you’re tempted to join the fun, this blog series is for you.

Here’s what you should know, first and foremost: there are a handful of highs and a truckload of lows when you write your first novel (and your second, and your third, and your fourth…) and when we’re marketing our books directly to our readers, we have no choice but to face the criticism head-on.

While some writers with major publishing deals can say lofty (and probably untrue, but whatever) things like, “I never read the reviews,” if you’re a new, independent writer sharing good reviews to try to drum up good press, you’re going to have to read the reviews.

All of them.

And some of them will make you cry.

That’s okay! Your dressage (hunter/jumper/western pleasure/fill-in-the-blank here) trainer has made you cry, but you still ride, right? We’re equestrians, so we’re used to pain equaling gain. We’re used to falling down, dusting ourselves up, and mounting again. Maybe that’s why we’re hanging on, growing, and actually thriving in such a difficult industry.

It’s just really hard to mash down a determined equestrian!

Writing for any audience is tough, but writing for equestrians is exceptionally challenging. In 2012, I interviewed Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley for the equestrian lifestyle site, Dappled Grey. Jane Smiley stormed into the equestrian scene with her massive racing/showing novel Horse Heaven, and became as common a barn name as any big name trainer. I remember working at the Ocala, Florida branch of Barnes & Noble when Horse Heaven was at its height. I was selling copies one after another to well-known hunter/jumper riders in town for HITS. I was actually star-struck by some of the luminaries who walked in and asked for the book by name.

But Horse Heaven, for all its popularity with the equestrian community and the wider world, didn’t get a follow-up. Instead, Smiley began a children’s series, beginning with The Georges and the Jewels, which taught excellent horsemanship, but didn’t get into the complicated and very adult lives of modern riders, trainers, and owners in the racing and showing business–something I loved because it reflected the world I lived in so beautifully.

So I asked Smiley, why did she stop writing equestrian novels for adults, when Horse Heaven was such a hit with her own crowd?

Here’s what Jane Smiley told me about writing equestrian fiction:

“The horse audience will toss the book out of the window if the voice isn’t expert. The audience isn’t big, and they’re critical, although they’re enthusiastic when they’ve committed. Sometimes you can make it work and sometimes you can’t. It’s not an easy audience to write for.”

Imagine writing huge multi-generational trilogies, imagine winning the Pulitzer Prize for fiction and having your novels turned into movies, and then finding equestrians too picky an audience to continue writing for. That’s what you’re up against when you decide to write a horse book.

But that’s okay. There are ways around this. There are ways to find your voice. There are ways to prove yourself to your audience. And that’s what we’re going to talk about in this blog series.

Watch this space for a post each week on writing horse books. Feel free to chime in, comment, and ask questions. Send me an email if you don’t want to go public with your writing aspirations; I promise confidentiality. Let’s talk about writing. Because honestly? I want to read your books. I write for this genre because eight years ago, sitting at my computer, I realized that all I wanted to read was more Horse Heaven. And no one was writing it.

So I wrote the book I wanted to read.

I’ve come a long way since my first novella, The Head and Not The Heart. I’ve made it through bad reviews and good, vicious emails and heart-warming messages, and even found myself in Lexington, Kentucky accepting runner-up at one of America’s richest book prizes before flying to Pimlico for a festival-day book-signing. I’ve spoken about the horse in fiction at Equine Affaire. I’ve been invited to work on conference proposals exploring animals in literature. It’s an exciting adventure, being an equestrian fiction author. I never know what’s going to arrive in my inbox next.

I love my writing life; I’m grateful for my writing life, which readers grant me every day when they choose to read my novels, and I want to encourage, nurture, inspire, and help new writers join the ranks in any way I can.

Let’s talk horse books, and writing them, together. I think this is going to be a good time.

What a year for horse books!

I’m so excited, I have to blog about it.

Today two of my favorite authors announced they have new books coming out this fall. And another favorite of mine just dropped the latest in a fast-paced serial which has “next weekend’s read” all over it. While there are always awesome new books to read, I’m really excited that these titles are all equestrian fiction.

How did that happen, anyway? Five years ago equestrian fiction as we know it did not exist. There were plenty of thrillers with horses in them, and lots of younger reader-to-young adult titles. But what we have now goes deeper than “a story with horses in it.” We have amazing and talented equestrians writing for equestrians – of all ages – with a modern contemporary voice and realistic, relatable plots.

I’m so excited. Did I say that already?

Anyway, now is the time to catch up with these authors before their new books come out. Here’s what we are looking at:

Mara Dabrishus is releasing the sequel to her gorgeous Saratoga story, Stay the DistanceIn case you were wondering what a perfect book cover looks like, it’s this one:

From MaraDabrishus.com

From MaraDabrishus.com

Wouldn’t this look great on merch? I’m thinking tote bag. Tote bag, Mara! Let’s make this happen!

The next one I’m psyched for? Mary Pagones’ Quick Bright Things Come to Confusion, a sequel to Fortune’s Fool.

Pagones Tweet

From Mary Pagones’ Twitter today!

I’m not surprised this cover is totally unique — so are Mary Pagones’ completely original approaches to equestrian fiction. I am so excited to get back into Simon’s head. I wonder if he still listens to The Killers all the time. I have so much respect for his musical taste.

(And this title is amazing.)

If you haven’t read Fortune’s Fool or The Horse is Never Wrong, I have a review of these books here.

So all of this to get excited for, and I’m still pumped for this weekend when I’m going to spend some quality time catching up with Loxwood, the delightful eventing series from British author Grace Wilkinson. I haven’t reviewed Loxwood or A Perfect Stridethe first two books in the series, because I’m behind on everything… but I can assure you they’re fantastic. Her new book, Between the Flags, picks up on a cliffhanger from A Perfect Stride. Let’s do this, weekend!

The latest from Grace Wilkinson promises more eventing delights.

The latest from Grace Wilkinson promises more eventing delights.

I know this isn’t even close to all the new horse books for the second half of 2016, but all of these coming at me at once have me kind of giddy! So if you’ll excuse me, I have a lot of reading to catch up on…!

Early Reviews for New Eventing Novel Pride

Yesterday saw the release of my newest novel, PrideIf you haven’t picked up my Eventing Series yet, this weekend is a perfect opportunity to get in on the action. This follow-up to Ambition doesn’t require you to read the other books, but if you want to meet the characters in their debuts, for a limited time, you can download the Kindle editions of Ambition and Show Barn Blues for $1.99 each.

Pride Promo Banner

 

Meanwhile, the buzz for Pride is growing with great reviews already posted at Amazon.

Here’s what readers are saying:

“One of the reasons people who love, ride, and work with horses are so appreciative of Natalie Keller Reinert’s fiction is the fact that her characters seem so true to life. Pride is no exception… The details about riding are spot on, particularly how to approach (and not approach) a cross-country or a show-jumping course…. Despite her many faults (I would almost consider Jules more of an anti-heroine than a heroine) I still appreciated the fact that Jules was so determined to succeed. I liked the fact that she wanted to be better than her eventing boyfriend Pete, versus wanting to stifle herself to flatter his ego (a common trope in many romance novels). This is a book about strong women with a passion for horses!”

-Mary Pagones, author of The Horse is Never Wrong and Fortune’s Fool

“Although Jules is not the easiest girl to get along with, she is very human in her actions and her failings, and pulls us into the story right alongside the horses! Reinert has quite a talent, bringing us the realities of being in the horse business and making us feel we are there with her!”

-Kathleen Edwards

“You get the best of both worlds with this one – you’ll read about the eventers of Ocala and the fancy show-jumpers of Orlando – and you as the reader have a front row seat as the two worlds collide! This sequel addresses the tough decisions that you sometimes need to make in order to get to the top – and Jules isn’t one to back down from a fight.”

-Laurie B.

“As a horse person I especially loved the description of Jules’ difficulties with mares! As any horseperson knows, you have to “ask a mare” but that’s not always compatible with Jules’ domineering personality.”

-Michelle Harper

I’m also really happy to share that Pride is currently the number one horse book on Kindle and the number three equestrian sports book on Kindle!

Prefer your book in paperback? Good news — I’ll have the paperback edition ready in the next two weeks, and I’ll update you here as well as at my Facebook page.

And now if you’ll excuse me, I have a lot more Rolex to watch — research for the next book? We’ll see…

Visit Amazon here to read a preview of Pride and get your copy.

Update: The Horseback Reads Book Club and Blog

I have two great updates for you from the Horseback Reads website!

The first is that today I have a blog post up entitled Still An Equestrian. As I’m sure some of you know, I’m an equestrian author without a horse. But it gets worse. I don’t even take lessons… or go on occasional trail rides with friends… I don’t have any (real-life) horse time at all!  So am I still an equestrian? You better believe I am, and I explore the reasons why we never lose that status here at Horseback Reads.

The second update is for our Horseback Reads Equestrian Book Club. We’re so excited to launch in the month of November! This is the perfect month to carve out a little “me time” with a good book. November gets crazy fast. Thanksgiving, holiday shopping, holiday decorating… it can get overwhelming quickly. Taking twenty minutes to relax and read will go a long way towards your overall peace of mind. And of course you want to read about horses!

Falling for Eli

Our November book club selection!

Our first title selection is Falling For Eli: How I Lost Heart, Then Gained Hope Through the Love of a Singular Horse, by Nancy Shulins. This is an absolutely lovely story about an off-track Thoroughbred, and I’m so excited to read it again. I actually wrote a review of Falling for Eli when it was first released… I’ll have to see if I can find the file and post it here! Still, I think the cover photo just speaks for itself — a silly chestnut Thoroughbred with a heart of gold.

At the end of the month we’ll have a live chat with author Nancy Shulins at our Horseback Reads Facebook page, so you’ll definitely want to pick up this book (don’t forget to check your local library!) so you can jot down some questions for the author.

(I’m so excited that we’re all just going to talk horse books together at the end of the month! This book club is the most fun idea ever!)

Below is the link for Falling For Eli at Amazon, and you can also find it at all other major retailers. Be sure to check in at our Facebook page and say hello, and tell your friends at the barn! Let’s start the Equestrian Book Club off right!

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