Last chance to benefit retired racehorses with Deck the Stalls

If you haven’t yet downloaded your copy of Deck the Stalls: Horse Stories for the Holidays, I have two compelling reasons why you should do it today… It goes off sale in two weeks!

Deck the Stalls: Horse Stories for the Holidays

Deck the Stalls: Horse Stories for the Holidays

Together with Jessica Burkhart, author of the best-selling Canterwood Crest series, we gathered together some of the hottest names in equestrian fiction to share holiday stories set in the stable, perfect for all ages. All proceeds from this collection are going to Old Friends, the retirement farm where some of horse racing’s heroes go to live out their days in peace and green grass.

In addition to an exclusive Canterwood Crest story from Jessica and an exclusive Eventing Series story from me, you can also find stories from:

-Mary Pagones – with an exclusive Fortune’s Fool story

Mara Dabrishus – with an exclusive Stay the Distance story

Kate Lattey – with an evocative New Zealand setting

Maggie Dana – with an all-new story from the author of Timber Ridge Riders

Brittney Joy – with an all-new story from the author Red Rocks Ranch

Kim Ablon Whitney – with an all-new story from the author of The Circuit

Reviews:

“As a horse lover I devour any horse related stories. These short stories really put you in the horsey holiday mood. This book was highly enjoyable. I think I found some new authors to look up as well.”

“Very enjoyable stories about young women striving to be great equestrians. It’s a nice holiday read and easy to put down and pick up.”

The ebook is available through January 31st from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iTunes, and other retailers. (You can use the universal ebook link for all sites except Amazon by clicking here.)

Watch out for a new edition of horse stories for the holidays, plus a paperback version, for Holiday 2017!

Thanks for supporting retired racehorses and equestrian fiction!

Join Me at Equine Affaire 2016

I can’t believe Equine Affaire is only a couple of weeks away! Mid-November still sounds like months in the future, maybe because we’ve only just had our first cool spell here in central Florida – it’s about sixty degrees this morning, guys! But it’s true: Equine Affaire’s Massachusetts expo, November 10th through 13th 2016, is in less than three weeks.

(And I only own sleeveless dresses, so please pray to the weather gods it’s unseasonably warm. Last time I went to Equine Affaire, it SNOWED.)

Join me at Equine Affaire 2016 - presentations, book-signings, or just a good chat about horses and books!

Join me at Equine Affaire 2016 – presentations, book-signings, or just a good chat about horses and books! Friday, Nov. 11 at 10 AM.

This year I’ll be on an author panel discussion about the importance of horses in fiction. If you’re here reading this, you know that horse books are the best books! What makes it that way, though? Is it just a mirror to the lives we love? Or is there something about horses that just makes any book better?

I’ll be in conversation with authors Laura Moore (who has a beautiful romance, Remember Me, set on a Thoroughbred farm in Virginia) and Holly Robinson (whose new novel, Folly Cove, features horses in a coastal northeastern town. Maybe she has some winter clothing advice for me). Our moderator is the talented Connie Johnson Hambley, whose novelsThe Troubles and The Charity are set in the horse world. It’s going to be a (slightly nerdy) amazing time.

Add our panel to your schedule: “Capturing the Essence of Horse in Fiction: How authors use horses to tell you a better story” on Friday, November 11th at 10:00 AM

And Hambley will be presenting with some of my favorite writers in another panel, as well! Mara Dabrishus, author of the remarkable and amazing (can you tell I love them) horse racing novels Staying the Distance and All Heart (among others) will be alongside also remarkable and amazing Maggie Dana, author of Timber Ridge Riders, and (also remarkable and talented) equestrian thriller writer, Patti Brooks.

Add their panel to your schedule: “Favorite Fictional Horses: From the Black Stallion to My Little Pony – What our favorites say about us” on Thursday, November 10th at 11:00 AM. 

Natalie Keller Reinert at Tampa Bay Downs.

Here’s a helpful photo of me looking intense and writerly so that I’m easy for you to spot and avoid – I mean spot and chat with – at Equine Affaire

Along with these panels, there will be plenty of chat-time at the best booth in all of Equine Affaire, Taborton Equine BooksI’ll be at the book-signing table, daring you to come talk to me, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

There will be paperbacks of my novels for sale, or bring your own!

If you’re on the fence about attending Equine Affaire, go visit the website and see all the other incredible presentations available. Then come see me. Because I can’t wait to meet you!

 

 

 

Join Natalie Keller Reinert at Equine Affaire 2016:

At the Seminar Stage

Friday, November 11, 2016: 10 AM

At Taborton Equine Books

Thursday, November 10, 2016: 3 PM – 5 PM

Friday, Nov. 11: 1 PM – 4 PM

Saturday, Nov. 12: 10 AM – 12 PM

Autographed Books: Turning For Home

I’m often getting requests for autographed copies of books, but since I rarely keep any stock at home, it’s usually something reserved for book-signing events. Well, I don’t have anything planned before this November’s Equine Affaire, but I do have books in stock!

The paperback of Turning For Home - complete with book award sticker!

The paperback of Turning For Home – complete with book award sticker!

If you’d like a signed copy of my award-finalist novel Turning For Home, now is the perfect opportunity. I have a limited number of paperbacks in stock. Just email me at natalie at nataliekreinert.com to order yours!

The cover price is $14.95, plus $5.00 for shipping anywhere in the United States, payable via PayPal. Shipment outside of the U.S. available upon request.

You’ll get a nice message and the book signed to you (or whoever you like)!

I’m happy to offer this service since so many readers have asked. Are you looking for another of my books with an autograph? Let me know!

Preakness Week Book Signing Event at Pimlico

Are you ready for the Preakness Stakes?

If you’re in Maryland this weekend, add Pimlico Racecourse to your plans on Friday. That’s because it’s Black-Eyed Susan Day, a celebration of all things Maryland horse-racing. There’ll be barn tours, giveaways, live racing (the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes, plus more!) and book signing events with some equestrian authors… like me!

Turning For Home coverI’ll be signing copies of my horse racing and Thoroughbred retirement novel Turning For Home, the recent finalist for the Dr. Tony Ryan Book Award. I’ll also have a few copies of my eventing novel, Ambition, on hand for anyone who wants them. You can also feel free to bring along any other titles by me you’d like signed!

I’d love to meet readers and talk horses and books with you, so please come out!

There will be several other authors there as well: Eliza McGraw will be signing Here Comes Exterminator!  and Joanne Beusch will be signing Brightly Shining: The Horse No One Wanted.

Find the horse books by the grandstand from 12 PM – 2 PM! Proceeds from our books will benefit the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance and Maryland Komen.

Preakness Day Credentials and book award stickers!

Preakness Day Credentials and book award stickers!

We’ll also be at the races on Preakness Day. This is my first time at Pimlico, and my first Preakness! After four or five Belmont Stakes, I figure it’s time to diversify my Triple Crown portfolio. No word yet on when I’ll be adding the Kentucky Derby to the mix.

Follow me on Twitter (@nataliekreinert) and Facebook — I’ll be live-tweeting from the races for as long as my phone signal and battery hold out!

Early Reviews for New Eventing Novel Pride

Yesterday saw the release of my newest novel, PrideIf you haven’t picked up my Eventing Series yet, this weekend is a perfect opportunity to get in on the action. This follow-up to Ambition doesn’t require you to read the other books, but if you want to meet the characters in their debuts, for a limited time, you can download the Kindle editions of Ambition and Show Barn Blues for $1.99 each.

Pride Promo Banner

 

Meanwhile, the buzz for Pride is growing with great reviews already posted at Amazon.

Here’s what readers are saying:

“One of the reasons people who love, ride, and work with horses are so appreciative of Natalie Keller Reinert’s fiction is the fact that her characters seem so true to life. Pride is no exception… The details about riding are spot on, particularly how to approach (and not approach) a cross-country or a show-jumping course…. Despite her many faults (I would almost consider Jules more of an anti-heroine than a heroine) I still appreciated the fact that Jules was so determined to succeed. I liked the fact that she wanted to be better than her eventing boyfriend Pete, versus wanting to stifle herself to flatter his ego (a common trope in many romance novels). This is a book about strong women with a passion for horses!”

-Mary Pagones, author of The Horse is Never Wrong and Fortune’s Fool

“Although Jules is not the easiest girl to get along with, she is very human in her actions and her failings, and pulls us into the story right alongside the horses! Reinert has quite a talent, bringing us the realities of being in the horse business and making us feel we are there with her!”

-Kathleen Edwards

“You get the best of both worlds with this one – you’ll read about the eventers of Ocala and the fancy show-jumpers of Orlando – and you as the reader have a front row seat as the two worlds collide! This sequel addresses the tough decisions that you sometimes need to make in order to get to the top – and Jules isn’t one to back down from a fight.”

-Laurie B.

“As a horse person I especially loved the description of Jules’ difficulties with mares! As any horseperson knows, you have to “ask a mare” but that’s not always compatible with Jules’ domineering personality.”

-Michelle Harper

I’m also really happy to share that Pride is currently the number one horse book on Kindle and the number three equestrian sports book on Kindle!

Prefer your book in paperback? Good news — I’ll have the paperback edition ready in the next two weeks, and I’ll update you here as well as at my Facebook page.

And now if you’ll excuse me, I have a lot more Rolex to watch — research for the next book? We’ll see…

Visit Amazon here to read a preview of Pride and get your copy.

Pride, the sequel to Ambition, is now available!

Pride (Book 2: The Eventing Series)

Now available on Kindle!

It’s a sequel years in the making: the second book in The Eventing Series, featuring Jules Thornton, a young trainer struggling to make her eventing dreams come true. Readers have been writing to me and asking for the next installment in Jules’ story ever since Ambition was first released. I’m happy to bring you all Pride, and I promise I have even more of this story to tell in the future!

Released this morning to coincide with the opening of Rolex Kentucky Three-Day-Event, Pride already has five-star reviews praising its behind-the-scenes-look at training and riding event horses. Here’s a look at a few of the nice things reviewers have been saying:

This is a book about strong women with a passion for horses!

The details about riding are spot on, particularly how to approach (and not approach) a cross-country or a show-jumping course. I love how Reinert describes riding different horses and the debates within the various disciplines about correct striding, pace, and trusting the horse versus carefully setting him up to succeed before a fence.

This book sucks you in right away and holds your attention all the way to the last page!

In Pride, which begins just weeks after the ending of Ambition, Jules has to come to grips with some of the financial and training headaches of modern eventing, a sport in a state of transition. While the old sport favored the bold, new eventing with its emphasis on trappy, show-jumping style combinations on the cross-country course, and the necessity for a perfect dressage score, has presented challenges to riders who are in the sport for the thrill of galloping and jumping. Jules, like a lot of event riders, sees the dressage as something she just has to get through. But dressage is the key to new eventing.

Her business is in trouble and her dreams haven’t gotten any smaller, so when a sponsor offers her potential financial backing, she can’t really afford to look away, even though their terms are less than thrilling. She can go to dressage boot camp with Orlando-based trainer Grace Carter, or she can keep looking for money to appear out of thin air.

Naturally, Jules would prefer to keep looking for money to appear out of thin air–she’s not exactly good at being told what to do. But something has changed since last year, and that’s Pete. Jules isn’t on her own anymore, but that means she can’t make decisions alone anymore. Her plans affect more than just her future.

If you haven’t read about Grace and her farm in Show Barn Bluesor even AmbitionI want to make it easy for you. Now through May 5th, you can download the Kindle editions of Show Barn Blues and Ambition for the special price of $1.99 each. Add in Pride, and you have three great equestrian novels for under $10.

(It’s not a bad way to deal with Rolex withdrawal next week.)

The Barn Behind “Show Barn Blues”

I was sorting through some photos on my computer (because I have too many, and it’s destroying my processing speed) when I realized I had a full stash of photos from the equestrian center that inspired Show Barn Blues. Since I went to a lot of trouble to describe the barn and grounds, I thought it might be fun to share them here.

These were taken by a gentleman who wanted to practice using his new camera. I’m not sure he had any horse knowledge, but he got some compelling shots nonetheless. One day a few weeks after I gave him permission to wander the grounds taking photos, he dropped off a CD of the photos, and I’ve had them ever since. There aren’t many exterior shots, but I think this gives you an idea of where it all started.

A Thoroughbred gazes down the aisle

The stalls with grills that opened were very desirable. This was one of the few OTTBs at the barn; I loved him. Forgot his name though. His back window would look out on the grass between the barn and the covered arena; not sure why it was closed here.

Looking down the barn aisle.

One of the aisles. Notice there are two aisles back-to-back, with a center aisle cutting the barn in half. If you squint you can see a high-up window above the stalls – that would be the apartments and Grace’s office. At the end of the aisle are the outdoor arenas. If this pair turns to their left, they’ll be heading to the covered arena. If they turned to the right, they’d pass the wash-stalls before entering the other aisle. The dress code was very formal here; instructors wore boots and breeches every day. This particular instructor had a background much like Kennedy’s – she rode in a now-closed dinner show attraction.

Wash-stalls in the center of the barn

The wash-stalls in the center of the barn, where school horses waited their turn. Someone should have knotted up these reins better!

Determined young rider.

A determined young rider who is probably now an adult riding in the dressage arena (the chains must be down for some reason). Behind is the covered arena with the usual weekend crowd of parents watching lessons.

Owner riding.

An owner out in the jumping arena on her horse. Behind her, a section of the barn not included in my books: the tack shop and lounge. In the books, the barn ends before the arenas, and the second-floor deck looks out over them.

The jumping arena

A riding instructor out in the jumping arena. If you rode out there at night, you could watch the Magic Kingdom fireworks just a little ways beyond those pine trees in the distance. That was typically also where the sky grew dark before approaching storms. The county highway is just beyond the fence but blocked by shrubbery. Across the street is, indeed, luxury homes, although at the time it was a watermelon field.

Horse at equestrian center

I think this is Splash. I used his name in Pride, maybe Show Barn Blues as well. He was a popular school horse for advanced riders. In the background, the covered walkway to the covered arena, and he’s standing in the end barn entrance.

With just a few changes, this is the barn in my mind when I work on book set at Seabreeze Equestrian Center. Does it look anything like you imagined?